Getting Mental Health Back On The World’s Agenda


For the second year in a row, concerns over COVID-19 led the World Economic Forum

For the second year in a row, concerns over COVID-19 led the World Economic Forum to hold its annual January Davos meeting virtually, rather than in person last week. For global leaders, this not only entailed the loss of the opportunity to interact with others, but also a truncated calendar of virtual events. One of the casualties of this abridged agenda was there was no discussion of one of the pandemic’s most serious and enduring consequences: the staggering rise in mental health illness.

According to a recent study of 204 countries published in The Lancet, in 2020, COVID-19 was responsible for generating an additional 53 million cases of major depressive disorder and 76 million additional cases of anxiety disorders. Younger adults and women were hit hardest, especially in countries with high case rates that generated strong virus mitigation measures like lockdowns and school closures.

This was the first global study on the mental health consequences of the pandemic, but it won’t be the last. Mental health impacts generally follow months after traumatic experiences, and this study took place well before the Omicron variant swept the world, without sparing the vaccinated who up to now felt protected against the virus.

Read the full article on the Forbes.com website